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Publications

The following is a list of abstracts from a portfolio of publications which have been published on the topics of OPEN FOCUS and Biofeedback. To access the full text of a publication click on the ORDER button. You will need to register to read the materials.  They are at NO cost to you.  Feel free to print one copy of each publication for your own personal use as long as you agree to respect the copyright rights of the authors and copyright laws

 

  •      A Program of Stress Management In A College Setting     

During the Spring semester of 1982, a program of stress management workshops was developed at Baruch College to bring the benefits of stress reduction to students. The program employed the Open Focus attention training technique. Data for 4 semesters have been examined to evaluate the results of using Open Focus attention in this program. During the first two semesters, Open Focus attention training was used without biofeedback training. In Spring 1983, biofeedback training was incorporated into the program and used during the Spring and Fall 1983 semesters. Changes in grade point average (GPA), stress related symptoms and physiological measures were examined. Two studies have been previously reported (Valdes, 1985a, 1985b). In the first study, the experimental subjects’ stress data were reported. In the second study, changes in GPA and stress data for experimental and control subjects were reported. The third study, reported in the present paper, introduced an additional control group: the conversation “rap session” control group. Changes in the same variables for experimental, control non-treatment, and conversation “rap session” control subjects were evaluated. Students in the control group showed decreased GPA, while those who participated in Open Focus training showed a trend toward improved GPA. All selected stress-related variables representative of different categories of stress showed significant improvement, as did physiological measures in all biofeedback modalities in which the experimental subjects were trained. Significantly greater improvement was shown by the experimental subjects over the control non-treatment and “rap-sessions” control groups. No significant change was found between the two control groups. As in the previous studies, these results support the hypothesis that the workshops were successful in reducing stress levels, and suggest that additional research, with other populations, be conducted to replicate these findings.

 

 

  • Attention to Attention

To realize fully our human potential is to learn to be aware of, to choose flexibility, andimplement effortlessly an expanding, dynamic range of attentional styles for the optimum allocation of our resources. A fundamental observation is presented in this paper: Attentional styles and brain wave activity are reflected in each other. Attentional styles are defined. Attentional biases are described and their impact and experience is suggested.  Optimum attention style combinations are recommended. Research data are presented. Talk therapy and attention are contrasted. How we use styles of attention to manage our experience is discussed. An umbrella identity is recommended as a gateway to flexible attention.

  • Effects of Biofeedback-Assisted Attention Training in a College Population

The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it provides a brief description of my experiencewith biofeedback-assisted training in independent practice, which led me to develop andconduct stress management workshops for a college population. Second, it presentspreliminary quantitative results obtained by means of these workshops; the resultsconfirmed my positive findings in independent practice.

  •  Mastering Our Brain’s Electrical Rhythm

Les Fehmi, a pioneering researcher and practitioner of neurofeedback, and Jim
Robbins, Author of A Symphony in the Brain: The Evolution of the New Brain WaveBiofeedback, argue that voluntary control over the Brain’s electrical rhythms enablesus to train ourselves to prevent or heal stress-related disorders and attention disorders.In addition, we may find a way to gain some of the benefits of meditation practice by means that are distinctively Western.

  •  OPEN FOCUS Attention and Neurofeedback Synchrony Training – Clinical Results and their Significance.

Previous research on information processing by the human brain prompted the need for further investigation of synchronized alpha brain wave activity at five loci. The results of this investigation indicated that a particular form of attention was associated with production of whole brain synchrony. Furthermore, it was found that learning to develop this form of attending coupled with the regular practice of multichannel alpha brain wave synchrony were a highly effective means of resolving many common stress related disorders. Analysis of 132 cases using this dual approach of systematic attention training and brain wave therapy found that more than 90% of the patients reported an alleviation of symptoms. These initial positive results with stress induced headache, joint pain, and gastrointestinal diseases were subsequently extended by Dr. Fehmi and others to treatment of diseases involving maladaptive immune responses, addictive behavior, attentional deficit problems, post traumatic stress disorder and epilepsy. It was also observed that levels of intellectual functioning and artistic and athletic performance were improved.

The authors propose that there exists a common mechanism operating in these widely different successful applications, to wit, attentional flexibility which is enhanced by systematic practice of audio taped exercises and neurofeedback therapy. Patients who participated in this program reported experiencing a release from their symptoms and conditional responses. The possible significance of this “release experience” is discussed and neurofeedback and OPEN FOCUS training are compared to other interventions which rely on peripheral modalities of biofeedback.

 

 

  • OPEN FOCUS. The Attentional Foundation of Health and Well-Being

The way we pay attention directly affects our bodies and minds. Two scientists not only describe open focusing, they also show how to do it.

  • Positive Outcome with Neurofeedback Treatment In A Mild Case of Autsim

 This article looks at the experience of Frankie, an autistic 8 1/2 year old boy. He was diagnosed mildly autistic by several specialists. One specialist claimed he was brain damaged and “autistic-like” and that there was no hope for improvement. At Frankie’s mothers request, neurotherapy diagnosis and treatment was begun. After 31 sessions, Frankie showed positive changes in all the diagnostic dimensions defining autism in  DSM-III-R. This has profound implications for treatment in a field with few low-risk alternatives.

  • Step Down Care for the Long Term Treatment of Essential Hypertension

 Does step-care treatment of hypertension increase cardiovascular risk and mortality?

  • The Effects of Electrode Placement Upon EEG Biofeedback Training: The Monopolar-Bipolar Controversy

      Roles of tradition, convenience, and noise or artifact rejection are discussed with regard
to the monopolar versus bipolar electrode placement controversy in
electroencephalography (EEG). Particular emphasis is placed on the relevance to
biofeedback. The crucial interactions between the differential amplifier, brain waves,
and monopolar/bipolar placements are discussed. Through logical analysis and
empirical observation, it is demonstrated how the very nature of the EEG’s differential
amplifiers must destroy elements of brain activity which are common to the recording
electrodes. Controlled experiments further illustrate the critical importance of electrode
placements. Various methods, including preferred electrode placements, are presented
to help resolve recording problems that frequently arise. It is concluded that there are
serious implications for researchers, EEG clinicians, biofeedback providers, and their
clients in preferring one type of electrode placement technique over the other. EEG
recording accuracy is affected by this choice.

Roles of tradition, convenience, and noise or artifact rejection are discussed with regard to the monopolar versus bipolar electrode placement controversy in
electroencephalography (EEG). Particular emphasis is placed on the relevance to biofeedback. The crucial interactions between the differential amplifier, brain waves, and monopolar/bipolar placements are discussed. Through logical analysis and empirical observation, it is demonstrated how the very nature of the EEG’s differential amplifiers must destroy elements of brain activity which are common to the recording electrodes. Controlled experiments further illustrate the critical importance of electrode placements. Various methods, including preferred electrode placements, are presented to help resolve recording problems that frequently arise. It is concluded that there are serious implications for researchers, EEG clinicians, biofeedback providers, and their clients in preferring one type of electrode placement technique over the other. EEG recording accuracy is affected by this choice.

  • Biofeedback in Private Practice and Stress Reduction in a College Population Using Biofeedback & OPEN FOCUS Technique

The purpose of this paper is two fold. First, it provides a brief description of my experience with biofeedback-assisted training in independent practice, which led me to develop and conduct stress management workshops for a college population. Second, it presents preliminary quantitative results obtained by means of these workshops; the results confirmed my positive findings in independent practice.